Overview

Why study physics and astronomy?

Because understanding the physical universe starts here.

Undergraduate Programs

The astronomy curriculum offers undergraduates a survey of modern astronomy and an introduction to physical science, gives science and engineering students an introduction to astronomy and astrophysics, and prepares students majoring in astronomy for graduate study in astronomy or related fields.

The physics curriculum includes course work for those who want a sound background in physics as part of their general education, for those who study physics as part of their training in other fields, and for those whose post-graduate plans include research or employment in physics or related fields.

Courses for Nonmajors

ASTR 191 is a survey of contemporary astronomy, taught at a level using basic mathematics; ASTR 391 offers an introduction to physical astronomy at a calculus-based level. PHSX 111 provides a general introduction to important physics topics and is taught at a level using basic algebra. The department offers two introductory physics sequences that include laboratory work. PHSX 114 and PHSX 115 cover the major fields of physics without calculus. PHSX 211 and PHSX 212, with labs PHSX 216 and PHSX 236, provide a calculus-based foundation in physics for students in physical science, engineering, and mathematics. PHSX 313 and the laboratory course, PHSX 316, provide an introduction to modern physics for majors in physics and some engineering and physical science programs.

Students in biological sciences, health sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, engineering, and prospective elementary and secondary teachers should see appropriate sections of this catalog and major advisors for guidance about required physics course work. Chemistry majors should note that PHSX 211 and PHSX 212 are prerequisites to advanced work in chemistry.

For programs in engineering physics, see the School of Engineering section of the online catalog.

Why study physics and astronomy?

Because understanding the physical universe starts here.

Graduate Programs

At the graduate level, the Department of Physics and Astronomy offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Physics and a Master of Science degree with a subspecialty in computational physics and astronomy.

Information about admission, requirements, and graduate programs is also on the Department of Physics & Astronomy web page.

Contact Info

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Malott Hall
1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Room 1082
Lawrence, KS 66045-7572
785-864-4626
http://www.physics.ku.edu/
Stephen J. Sanders, Chair
785-864-4626
Philip S. Baringer, Associate Chair
785-864-4626

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Malott Hall
1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Room 1082
Lawrence, KS 66045-7572
785-864-4626
http://www.physics.ku.edu/
Stephen J. Sanders, Chair
785-864-4626
Philip S. Baringer, Associate Chair
785-864-4626

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Malott Hall
1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Room 6070A
Lawrence, KS 66045-7572
785-864-4626
http://www.physics.ku.edu/
Hume Feldman, Director of Graduate Studies
785-864-4740
Gregory Rudnick, Graduate Advisor
785-864-4626
Why KU
  • One of 34 public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
  • 2nd in the nation for prestigious faculty Fulbright awards
  • 26 Rhodes scholars
  • Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
  • One of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs. U.S. News and World Report