Courses

Show courses with a course number to
worth in

Also search by: catalog number course title description principal course code field of study code

HWC 110: Introduction to Humanities (3 ) HL H
An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education, perspectives and methods in the humanities, the humanities and human diversity, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 111: Introduction to Humanities, Honors (3 ) HL H
An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education; perspectives and methods in the humanities; the humanities and human diversity; and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 114: Western Civilization I Honors (3 ) H
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 115: Western Civilization II Honors (3 ) H
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 150: Civilizations and the Individual (3 ) HL H
Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 151: Civilizations and Individual, Honors (3 ) HL H
Honors version of HWC 150. Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, or permission of instructor LEC
View current sections...
HWC 177: First Year Seminar: _____ (3 ) U
A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Humanities and Western Civilization. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 204: Western Civilization I (3 ) H
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen except members of the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 205: Western Civilization II (3 ) H
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen except members of the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 206: Contemporary Western Civilization (3 ) HL H
A sequel to the two Western Civilization courses which offers the opportunity to examine influential works of literature, philosophy, history, and political thought written since the end of World War II. In keeping with the decline of colonialism and the growth of global and multicultural civilization since 1945, the readings of the course are selected from both Western and non-Western writers. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 300: Studies In: _____ (3 ) H
An interdisciplinary course, focusing on different topics and drawing on diverse media, cultures, and historical periods. Humanities-based, this course, depending on its topic, may include the arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. May be repeated for credit with different topics. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 302: European Culture and Society 1945 to Present (3 ) HT H
The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as EURS 302.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 304: Masterpieces of World Literature I (3 ) HL H
The study of great books in English translation from antiquity through the fifteenth century from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 308: Masterpieces of World Literature II (3 ) HL H
The study of great books in English translation from the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 312: Masterpieces of World Literature III (3 ) HL H
The study of great books in English translation in the modern period (late nineteenth and twentieth centuries) from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 317: Greek and Roman Art (3 ) H/W
A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E. -500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as CLSX 317, HA 317.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 324: Undergraduate Writing & Research Methods (1 ) H
Preparation for senior thesis project required of HWC majors. Introduction to writing strategies, library investigation, and time management skills. Open to HWC majors and others engaged in research and writing at the undergraduate level. Class will proceed by discussion of skills, methods, and examples, and will culminate in a written proposal from each student. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 325: Theory and Method in Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities (3 ) H
An introduction to recent cultural theory and interdisciplinary methods used across the humanities and qualitative social sciences. Includes examination of traditional views of the humanities and its implicit cultures along with discussion of new methodologies of cultural analysis. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 328: Law and the Legal Profession (3 ) H
An overview of Western Legal education, both in historical and modern contexts. Legal subjects such as constitutional law, contracts, property, the courts and ethics are also studied. Students gain perspective on law as a profession, and the legal environments in which we live. Note: this course does not guarantee admission to law school or constitute entry into the legal profession as a career. It is intended to provide information and help students identify interests in the field of legal study. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 335: Introduction to Indigenous Studies (3 ) NW H
This course is an introduction to the study of modern and historic indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods and content relevant to Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from the diverse indigenous cultures. Special attention is paid to the various ways in which standard academic disciplines --history, anthropology, literature, law, political science, among others --contribute to the study of Indigenous cultures and current issues. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of indigenous life are interconnected and tribal histories and cultures cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. (Same as ISP 335.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 350: American Indians Since 1865 (3 ) H
This course examines American Indian/White relations from reconstruction to the present. It surveys the impact of westward expansion and cultural changes brought about by the Civil War, forced education, intermarriage, the Dawes Act, the New Deal, the World Wars, termination, relocation and stereotypical literature and movies. The class also addresses the Red Power and AIM movements, as well as indigenous efforts to decolonize and to recover and retain indigenous knowledge. After learning about the past from both Native and non-Native source materials, students will multiple perspectives about historical events and gain understandings of diverse world views, values, and responses to adversity. (Same as HIST 352 and ISP 350.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 370: The Twentieth Century (3 ) H
An integrated study of several disciplines such as history, philosophy, art, music, and literature as they relate to the twentieth century in one country, or one historical or aesthetic movement occurring during this time. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 374: Gender and Sexuality, Ancient and Modern (3 ) H
Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern nations and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as CLSX 374.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 380: Modern Themes, Ancient Models: _____ (3 ) H
The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as CLSX 350.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 390: Comparative Literary Theory (3 ) H
A study of selected works in literary theory and of selected problems in literary interpretation and comparative literary methodology, designed to examine and apply systematically basic critical principles and approaches. Study of approaches such as feminism, Marxism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies are carried out through discussion and writing. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 410: Dante's Comedy (3 ) H
The complete Divine Comedy will be read in English translation, with equal stress on each of its three parts--the Inferno, the Purgatory, and the Paradise. The poem will be explained for the general reader by specialists having a variety of perspectives. (Same as HIST 420.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 420: The Interrelations of the Humanities and the Arts (3 ) H
An interdisciplinary seminar on the relations of several of the humanities and the arts. Topics will vary, but the interrelation of the humanities and arts will be the central focus. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the junior year. Required of students majoring in humanities. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 424: Senior Seminar in Humanities (3 ) H
A seminar to result in the student's integration of knowledge within the Humanities major. Students undertake a project that reflects and utilizes the interdisciplinary perspectives of the humanities. Options for the final project include a portfolio, web page, or significant writing project. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the senior year. Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9 hours of upper division courses in the major. IND
View current sections...
HWC 430: European Civilization in World Context: _____ (3 ) HL H
An introduction to the literature of encounters between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as EURS 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 435: Islam in Europe (3 ) H
Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as EURS 435.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 436: Islam in Europe, Honors (3 ) H
Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. Not open to students who have completed EURS/HWC 435 LEC
View current sections...
HWC 460: Animals in Art and Literature (3 ) H
A study of the role of animals (especially mammals), both wild and domesticated, in defining the nature of human beings and human culture through the disciplines of religious studies, philosophy, history, art and literature. Both western and non-western courses are examined. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 464: Visions in Art and Literature (3 ) H
A study of the phenomenon of visions, their expression in various media, and theories of visionary experience from the humanities and social sciences, with a particular emphasis on critically evaluating the relationship between the visionary experience and its expression. (Same as REL 464). LEC
View current sections...
HWC 468: Illness in Art and Literature (3 ) H
An examination of how illness and health have been conceptualized, expressed, and explored in Western literature and art, as well as a consideration of issues and health from the perspectives of philosophy and religious studies. (Same as REL 468). LEC
View current sections...
HWC 470: American Health Care: From Origins to Modern Models (3 ) H
An interdisciplinary analysis of the historical origins and present currents within American medicine. This is an integrated study of basic historical, political, economic and professional influences that underlie the character and practice of health care in our century. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 477: Gender and Religion (3 ) H
Examination of the symbols, images, scriptures, rites and teachings that define gender in various religious traditions. (Same as REL 477.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 490: Roots of Federal Indian Policy (3 ) H
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideologies of US Federal Indian policy. It surveys European intellectual trends that were influential in creating policies applied to colonized native peoples. The course explores the origins of such policies, including removals, "civilization programs," the reservation period, the Dawes (Allotment) Act, the New deal, termination, relocation, NAGPRA and tribal rights, in addition to issues surrounding American Indian identity, tribal membership and demographics. This course serves as a foundation for more in- depth study of Federal Indian Law pertinent to the Indigenous peoples of the United States. (Same as ISP 490.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 494: Humanities Directed Study: _____ (1-3 ) H
Investigation of a subject in fields or on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Does not replace or satisfy specific course requirements for the HWC major. May be counted as part of the total junior-senior credit hours required. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 500: Studies in: _____ (3 ) H
A study of significant themes, topics, or problems in the humanities. May also relate an issue in the humanities to the social sciences or natural sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 505: Europe Today (3 ) H
An exploration of major social, political and economic developments post World War II including the rise of the European Union, the integration of Eastern and Western Europe, the growing role of Islam, attitudes towards the United States, and Europe's role in the world economy. Topics may vary based on current events. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 510: Science, Technology, and Society (2-3 ) H
The objective of this course is to provide members of the university community with information that enables them to judge the humanistic, moral, and ethical implications of scientific and technological developments. Formal presentations by guest lecturers, followed by question-and-answer periods, will alternate with panel discussions, symposia, etc., prepared by faculty members drawn from the various departments, schools, and organizational units of K.U. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 514: Totalitarianism and Literature in Central Europe (3 ) H
This course asks how fiction written in Central Europe engaged and grappled with the totalitarian experience imposed by Nazi and Soviet forms of government. The course focuses on the works by 20th-century Polish, Czech, and Hungarian writers that deal with totalitarianism. (Same as SLAV 514.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 520: Literature in Translation: _____ (3 ) H
Studies in one or more national literatures. Discussion and frequent critical papers. Prerequisite: Completion of one junior-senior level course in a language and literature department. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 524: Chinese Thought (3 ) NW H/W
A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and PHIL 506.) Prerequisite: Eastern civilization course or a course in Asian history or a distribution course in philosophy. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 530: Study of a Culture: _____ (3 ) H/W
An interdisciplinary study of elements that have contributed to the development of a particular civilization, such as Irish, Scottish, or Scandinavian. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 538: Pompeii and Herculaneum (3 ) H
An interdisciplinary treatment of the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy. Emphasis on the structures and decorations of major public spaces and houses and on aspects of cultural, social, political, commercial and religious life from the period of the second century B.C.E. to 79 C.E., when Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Slide lectures and discussion. (Same as CLSX 538, HA 538) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, History of Art, or permission of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 540: Translation (3 ) H
Students will undertake substantial work in the translation of non-technical writing, e.g., poems, short stories, novels, essays, from any foreign language to English, and examine the practical and theoretical problems encountered in or raised by translation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of at least third-year foreign language work. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 566: The Devil in Russian Literature (3 ) H
This course traces the various manifestations of the Devil through Russian and European folklore, myth, theology, culture, and literature. Although the focus is on Russian literature, classic European works are discussed, as they had a powerful impact on the modern Russian conception of the Evil One. Readings in English. (Same as SLAV 566.) LEC
View current sections...
HWC 570: Men and Masculinities (3 ) H
An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HIST 626, WGSS 570.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in History, Humanities and Western Civilization, or Women Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 575: The Body, Self and Society (3 ) H
An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with contemporary theories of embodiment and senses as they are applied to a variety of historical themes, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HIST 625, WGSS 575.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in History, Humanities and Western Civilization, or Women Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 600: Biography of a City: _____ (3 ) H/W
Examination in depth of the historical, social, and artistic growth and development of one major urban center. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 620: Study of a Culture: _____ (3 ) H/W
An interdisciplinary study of elements that have contributed to the development of a particular civilization, such as Irish, Scottish, or Scandinavian. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 770: Research in Men and Masculinities (3 )
An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western World since the sixteenth century. Students will become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, examine in depth the interplay between manhood and modernity, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. May be repeated if content varies sufficiently. LEC
View current sections...
HWC 775: Advanced Study in the Body and Senses (3 )
An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the West since the sixteenth century. Emphasis is on understanding how contemporary theories of embodiment are applied to concrete historical or contemporary problems. May be repeated if course content varies sufficiently. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 120: Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies (3 ) HT H
An introduction to the content and methods of peace studies. Peace studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of war and peace. Building on and integrating the work of various fields of study, the course examines the causes of structural and direct violence within and among societies and the diverse ways in which humans have sought peace, from conquest and balance of power to international organizations and nonviolent strategies. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 121: Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies, Honors (3 ) H
An introduction to the content and methods of peace studies. Peace studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of war and peace. Building on and integrating the work of various fields of study, the course examines the causes of structural and direct violence within and among societies and the diverse ways in which humans have sought peace, from conquest and balance of power to international organizations and nonviolent strategies. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed PCS 120. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 329: History of War and Peace (3 ) HL H
A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and EURS 329.) LEC
View current sections...
PCS 550: Classics of Peace Literature (3 ) HL H
A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1515) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as EURS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 555: Topics in Peace and Conflict Studies: _____ (3 ) H
This course offers specialized or interdisciplinary perspectives on historical, political, social, and religious movements, institutions, societies, agencies, or texts dealing with conflict resolution. May be repeated for credit with different topics. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 556: Education for Peace and Non-Violence (3 ) H
This course reviews the history, aims and methodology of peace education. Topics include examination of the roots and causes of social violence; educational initiatives that seek to reduce structural and direct violence; and teaching methodologies in the field of multicultural education and pedagogy. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 560: Directed Study in Peace and Conflict Studies (1-3 ) H
Practicum or research under the supervision of a faculty member and with the approval of the Peace and Conflict Studies Minor. Individual conferences, reports, and papers, and, in the case of practicum, supervised experience with an approved organization or agency. Prerequisite: Completion of three core courses in the minor. IND
View current sections...
PCS 565: The Literature of Human Rights (3 ) H
Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as EURS 565.) LEC
View current sections...
PCS 650: Senior Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies (3 ) H
This capstone seminar provides a sustained and in-depth study of a particular topic in Peace and Conflict Studies, to be chosen by the instructor. Each student is required to carry out a substantive research project to produce a term paper or comparable work. Required for completion of minor. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least nine hours in the minor before enrolling. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 760: Investigation and Conference in Peace and Conflict Studies (3 )
Research under the supervision of a faculty member and approved for the Peace and Conflict Studies program. Individual conferences, reports, and papers; may be combined with classwork. Open only to graduate students. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 801: Peace and Conflict Studies: Texts and Methods (3 )
An interdisciplinary study of the historic literature on human conflict and peacemaking and the methods used to analyze and interpret the literature. Peace literature encompasses a range of genres that include religious teachings, philosophical essays, political proposals, treaties and conventions, fiction, poetry, and drama. Approaches to solutions to human conflict cover a spectrum including political revolution, diplomacy and treaties, international law and organizations, and world government. Students produce a substantial graduate-level research project. PCS 801 is required for the Graduate Certificate in Peace & Conflict Studies, and to be taken as early as possible in the students program of study. Open only to graduate students. LEC
View current sections...
PCS 850: Peace and Conflict Studies Research Seminar (3 )
The capstone of the Graduate Certificate program, providing a sustained and in-depth study of a particular topic in Peace & Conflict Studies, to be chosen by the instructor. The members of the seminar have the option of doing a research project or supervised practicum resulting in a substantial paper that integrates their work in the program. Required for the Graduate Certificate and open only to graduate students. Prerequisite: At least six hours of course work toward the Graduate Certificate including PCS 801. SEM
View current sections...

Number of results: 66 (Page 1 of 1)

Contact Info

Humanities and Western Civilization Program

Bailey Hall
1440 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 308
Lawrence, KS 66045-7545
785-864-3011
785-864-3023
hwc@ku.edu
http://www.hwc.ku.edu/
Sandra Zimdars-Swartz, Director
785-864-3011
Antha Cotten-Spreckelmeyer, Associate Director and Undergraduate Coordinator
785-864-3011
Why KU
  • One of 34 public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
  • 2nd in the nation for prestigious faculty Fulbright awards
  • 26 Rhodes scholars
  • Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
  • One of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs. U.S. News and World Report